Diverse Career Pathways for Philosophers

Resources for Career Exploration and Job Searching in Academia, Non-Profits, Government, and the Private Sector

Graduate studies in philosophy train you in a specific set of skills and areas of expertise. These can prepare you for a broad spectrum of careers, including careers within academia, non-profits, government, and the private sector. The resources listed below can help you explore and prepare for careers in all of these fields.

At Northwestern

PHIL 488: Philosophy Department Professionalization Course

Students should start participating in professional development opportunities and exploring career options well before they plan to apply for jobs. Students who plan to go on the academic job market should consult with their faculty advisors to determine the appropriate time. Typically, students who plan to apply for academic postdoctoral positions and faculty position do so in their 5th year.

The professional skills course provides a workshop in which graduate students who are about to enter the job market can refine their application materials and skills. Attention is paid to a variety of elements in one’s dossier, including a CV, dissertation abstract, writing sample, statement of teaching philosophy, sample syllabi, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and cover letter. Students also create or refine a personal website, construct brief oral presentations of their work, and practice their interview skills. 

Academic Job market timeline:

(Please note that this is a typical timeline; some institutions will be earlier or later, and postdocs and one-year positions are typically advertised later in the year.)


March: Enroll in professional skills seminar; continue to submit papers to conferences and journals
 
Late August: Ask for letters; provide writers with final (or close enough) versions of your CV, abstract, writing sample, and narrative; provide your teaching-letter writer with your statement of teaching philosophy, CTEC information, sample syllabi, and narrative
 
September: Begin looking at philjobs.org; talk to your advisor about scheduling a defense for the Spring; refine your dossier; set up Interfolio; perfect your website
 
October & November: Most application deadlines
 
Late November & December: Contact from departments interested in interviewing you
 
Late December & January: Interviews (now typically by videoconferencing)
 
January & February: On-campus interviews
 
February & March: Wait to hear final decisions
 
April & May: Finish and defend dissertation; TGS deadline for receiving final materials is early May
 

TGS supports development opportunities that allow graduate students to build core competencies needed for success in a wide range of careers.

Northwestern Career Advancement has helpful resources for exploring and applying for a broad range of jobs in all fields. They also offer one-on-one advising for graduate students.

TGS has several GAship and Internship opportunities you may wish to explore. You can also look into the professional development opportunities to develop core competencies for meeting academic and professional goals. These professional development opportunities are announced via The Wire (published weekly via email) and online news.

Philosophy-Specific Resources

APA's Beyond Academia: Professional Opportunities for Philosophers provides guidance in the form of resources, information, and advice to philosophers who are interested in exploring a wide range of professions outside of academia.

PhilSkills is a collection of interviews with philosophy PhDs in non-faculty careers created by a University of Michigan philosophy PhD.

Humanities Resources and Opportunities

MLA's Connected Academics provides stories from Humanities academics in a variety of careers.

Stanford has a great application, TREE, to evaluate your skills, values  and career interests.

Humanities@Work is a UC-wide initiative geared towards UC Humanities and humanistic Social Science MAs and PhDs interested in careers outside/alongside the academy. You may find helpful advice and networking opportunities here.

American Historical Association provides resources and information for career diversity for historians, which can be useful for other humanities students.

American Council of Learned Societies has many fellowship opportunities for humanities.

Graduate Career Development Resources

Inside HigherEd has a career advice section with tips and advice.

Versatile PHD allows you to connect with other PhDs and ABDs with careers outside academia and hear their stories.